Discussion:
Advice, Please... coming to end of 2-yr plan, re-up?
(too old to reply)
Nat
2004-04-27 05:49:32 UTC
Permalink
After reading the well informed people who hang out here, it occurs to me
you're a lot better informed than I. I've been a Verizon customer for, I
guess, about 10 years or so? Anyway, I've never really done the math. Is it
really better to do the 2-yr deal and lock yourself in or face a $175 hit?
Or, is it better to pay more, get a 1-yr deal and have the opportunity to
stay current? I ask, because I have an old LG510? phone and I understand
the newer phones "get out" better in poor/weak areas?? I know every
situation is different, but do some of you have some "general" thoughts
about 1yr vs. 2yr? It seems that with the rapid changes in phones, 2-yrs
might be a long time to wait.

Thanks, Nathaniel
Larry W4CSC
2004-04-27 11:52:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nat
After reading the well informed people who hang out here, it occurs to me
you're a lot better informed than I. I've been a Verizon customer for,
I guess, about 10 years or so? Anyway, I've never really done the
math. Is it really better to do the 2-yr deal and lock yourself in or
face a $175 hit? Or, is it better to pay more, get a 1-yr deal and
have the opportunity to stay current? I ask, because I have an old
LG510? phone and I understand the newer phones "get out" better in
poor/weak areas?? I know every situation is different, but do some of
you have some "general" thoughts about 1yr vs. 2yr? It seems that with
the rapid changes in phones, 2-yrs might be a long time to wait.
Thanks, Nathaniel
If you are happy with your current plan setup, Nat, I wouldn't sign
anything or take the carrot phone dangling from that stick. The reason the
company dangles the stick is so it can make changes to its system, usually
to boost profits, not improve customer service and give you something for
free. The newer the phone, two things have happened.....

We started out with phones transmitting 3 watts of RF power from
substantial antennas. These transmitters covered way too much area,
soaking up the channels across larger areas, which worked great but limited
the number of billable minutes per square mile per channel. The solution
was simple....put up more, smaller towers and reduce the range of the
phones from a 10 mile circle to a 3 mile circle. The AMPS flipphone was
the result. It's transmitter only put out 6/10th of a watt (600 mw) and
they reduced the substantial "rubber duck" 1/4 wave antenna with a real
elevated ground sleeve to a 1/4 wave stub right up next to the customer's
RF-absorbing head, which gave us the poor service on the AMPS system
designed for 3 watt phones with real antennas. The public was pissed.
Their service went from good to sucks, for the "convenience" of the pocket
phone.

About this time CDMA, TDMA, and a host of other INCOMPATIBLE digitizing
schemes came along that needed to be sold to the customers. Cellular took
this opportunity to increase their billable minutes per square mile per
channel to new heights by installing lots of little cells, and reducing
power even further to 2/10th of a watt (200 mw). Of course, logic would
tell you the range of the 200 mw phone was no where near the 600 mw phones.
Physics, no matter what the marketing department says, still controls radio
propagation. The modulation schemes allowed the companies to share the
channel amoungst many users. This number expanded as the modulation
schemes came out with new revisions and bug fixes...just like your
computer. One of the problems these modulation schemes encountered was
receiver recovery in the microseconds between the phone a block from the
tower to a phone out on the fringe screaming its head off at "full power",
200 mw. The strong station blocked the receiver's listening ability after
it went off the air after its packet, and the receiver missed a piece of
the data packet of the weak one. The solution to this problem was power
control. Your 200 mw phone in short range of the towers on a concentrated
system rarely runs 200 mw. When the CDMA system becomes confused with the
data, you hear the echo everyone has heard, or it sounds like your party is
underwater with missing data or the phone simply cuts off to prevent
pissing you off with lousier-than-normal sound. You frantically move
around looking for a "hot spot" where the data stream opens the phone,
again. (AMPS customers hunt easier to get the hissing of the FM receiver
to quiet.)

Cellular has no economic reason to make your NEW-every-two phone have more
power and range. No, it's to their advantage to REDUCE the power and range
of your phone even further, once again to increase the revenue they can
squeeze out of every square mile of urban area. Many new phones have "new
features", like 150 milliwatt transmitters and non-existant antennas built
into the case, which that pesky physics says will reduce the field strength
of the transmitters even further. None of it is about improving range you
have to the towers, especially out of town where there will NEVER be a
tower every 2 miles in all directions for the little toyphones to contact
because those towers would NEVER produce the kinds of revenue streams that
make them profitable.....

If you're not interested in buying a toy with video games on it that makes
toy sounds and has blinky lights....keep the old phone which IS a better
TELEPHONE. If you want a new game boy buy a GAMEBOY to go with your old
phone....(c;

Sorry you can't have a big, honkin', powerful old AMPS bagphone like mine
for that trip in the country......AMPS COUNTRY. The rest of it is just
bullshit.

Larry
Dr.wireMORE
2004-04-27 12:48:55 UTC
Permalink
The dr offers: If your going to be a long term cell phone user, take the
most phone you can get for free, and renew. If you like your current
phone/plan, then do nothing and enjoy what you have. It is currently a new
every two, and maybe someday it will become a new every one, or new when
ever you want to change? But not likely. No matter what phone you get,
there will be something new and improved out shortly.

The new every two is (supposed) only available to people with 2 yr contracts
$35.00 (although this will vary by market/agent, as we've seen the old lady
with the 100 minute $15/month plan get a free phone and not change her plan.
Yes it can be to everyone's advantage to put some into new technology) I
would have to guess that if Larry really is using his bag-phone, that the
tech's in the area would "pay him" to change to smaller/less powerful phone.

PS: while Larry might be right about many things; a by-product of the
smaller powered phone, and less powerful cell tower is more capacity for
more people to use more phones in more areas simultaneously. There was no
other solution to a growing capacity issue. (In my opinion)

Dr.
<snip>
Post by Nat
Is it really better to do the 2-yr deal and lock yourself in or
face a $175 hit? Or, is it better to pay more, get a 1-yr deal and
have the opportunity to stay current? I ask, because I have an old
LG510? phone and I understand the newer phones "get out" better in
poor/weak areas?? I know every situation is different, but do some of
you have some "general" thoughts about 1yr vs. 2yr? It seems that with
the rapid changes in phones, 2-yrs might be a long time to wait.
Thanks, Nathaniel
If you are happy with your current plan setup, Nat, I wouldn't sign
anything or take the carrot phone dangling from that stick. The reason the
company dangles the stick is so it can make changes to its system, usually
to boost profits, not improve customer service and give you something for
free.
<snip>
Larry
Nat
2004-04-28 06:50:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr.wireMORE
The dr offers: If your going to be a long term cell phone user,
take the most phone you can get for free, and renew. If you like
your current phone/plan, then do nothing and enjoy what you have. It
is currently a new every two, and maybe someday it will become a new
every one, or new when ever you want to change? But not likely. No
matter what phone you get, there will be something new and improved
out shortly.
..snip..

Dr., thanks, too, for your help and opinion. I appreciate it.

Nat
Richard Ness
2004-04-27 18:48:45 UTC
Permalink
<20% fact, >80%, well let's just say... not...

1st, you neglect to say that if we all were STILL using AMPS phones
with the vast number of subscribers that now are on the systems, you
would be blocked much of the time. AMPS would NO WAY, NO HOW accommodate
the sheer number of users that now have cell phones. So, your continual argument
that the advent of digital was driven by some conspiracy of greed, is total and complete
BS. Digital is and was the ONLY way to accommodate today's number of users. AMPS
is an old antiquated and OBSOLETE technology, it couldn't handle the increased traffic.

Also, the market demanded portability. It wasn't forced on the public like you infer.
The FCC mandated .6w. This was by regulation, not by some plot cooked up by
cell phone companies to cram more users onto the systems. More total BS....

Power control is integral to how CDMA operates and was part of the standard
from the very beginning. BTW, you do know that AMPS has/had power control, right?

I don't have time to counter your errors point by point. Nat and other newbies, please
be wise and take this type of 'expert' advice with a VERY large grain of salt. It ain't
anywhere near correct.
Post by Larry W4CSC
Post by Nat
After reading the well informed people who hang out here, it occurs to me
you're a lot better informed than I. I've been a Verizon customer for,
I guess, about 10 years or so? Anyway, I've never really done the
math. Is it really better to do the 2-yr deal and lock yourself in or
face a $175 hit? Or, is it better to pay more, get a 1-yr deal and
have the opportunity to stay current? I ask, because I have an old
LG510? phone and I understand the newer phones "get out" better in
poor/weak areas?? I know every situation is different, but do some of
you have some "general" thoughts about 1yr vs. 2yr? It seems that with
the rapid changes in phones, 2-yrs might be a long time to wait.
Thanks, Nathaniel
If you are happy with your current plan setup, Nat, I wouldn't sign
anything or take the carrot phone dangling from that stick. The reason the
company dangles the stick is so it can make changes to its system, usually
to boost profits, not improve customer service and give you something for
free. The newer the phone, two things have happened.....
We started out with phones transmitting 3 watts of RF power from
substantial antennas. These transmitters covered way too much area,
soaking up the channels across larger areas, which worked great but limited
the number of billable minutes per square mile per channel. The solution
was simple....put up more, smaller towers and reduce the range of the
phones from a 10 mile circle to a 3 mile circle. The AMPS flipphone was
the result. It's transmitter only put out 6/10th of a watt (600 mw) and
they reduced the substantial "rubber duck" 1/4 wave antenna with a real
elevated ground sleeve to a 1/4 wave stub right up next to the customer's
RF-absorbing head, which gave us the poor service on the AMPS system
designed for 3 watt phones with real antennas. The public was pissed.
Their service went from good to sucks, for the "convenience" of the pocket
phone.
About this time CDMA, TDMA, and a host of other INCOMPATIBLE digitizing
schemes came along that needed to be sold to the customers. Cellular took
this opportunity to increase their billable minutes per square mile per
channel to new heights by installing lots of little cells, and reducing
power even further to 2/10th of a watt (200 mw). Of course, logic would
tell you the range of the 200 mw phone was no where near the 600 mw phones.
Physics, no matter what the marketing department says, still controls radio
propagation. The modulation schemes allowed the companies to share the
channel amoungst many users. This number expanded as the modulation
schemes came out with new revisions and bug fixes...just like your
computer. One of the problems these modulation schemes encountered was
receiver recovery in the microseconds between the phone a block from the
tower to a phone out on the fringe screaming its head off at "full power",
200 mw. The strong station blocked the receiver's listening ability after
it went off the air after its packet, and the receiver missed a piece of
the data packet of the weak one. The solution to this problem was power
control. Your 200 mw phone in short range of the towers on a concentrated
system rarely runs 200 mw. When the CDMA system becomes confused with the
data, you hear the echo everyone has heard, or it sounds like your party is
underwater with missing data or the phone simply cuts off to prevent
pissing you off with lousier-than-normal sound. You frantically move
around looking for a "hot spot" where the data stream opens the phone,
again. (AMPS customers hunt easier to get the hissing of the FM receiver
to quiet.)
Cellular has no economic reason to make your NEW-every-two phone have more
power and range. No, it's to their advantage to REDUCE the power and range
of your phone even further, once again to increase the revenue they can
squeeze out of every square mile of urban area. Many new phones have "new
features", like 150 milliwatt transmitters and non-existant antennas built
into the case, which that pesky physics says will reduce the field strength
of the transmitters even further. None of it is about improving range you
have to the towers, especially out of town where there will NEVER be a
tower every 2 miles in all directions for the little toyphones to contact
because those towers would NEVER produce the kinds of revenue streams that
make them profitable.....
If you're not interested in buying a toy with video games on it that makes
toy sounds and has blinky lights....keep the old phone which IS a better
TELEPHONE. If you want a new game boy buy a GAMEBOY to go with your old
phone....(c;
Sorry you can't have a big, honkin', powerful old AMPS bagphone like mine
for that trip in the country......AMPS COUNTRY. The rest of it is just
bullshit.
Larry
Richard Ness
2004-04-27 18:48:25 UTC
Permalink
<20% fact, >80%, well let's just say... not...

1st, you neglect to say that if we all were STILL using AMPS phones
with the vast number of subscribers that now are on the systems, you
would be blocked much of the time. AMPS would NO WAY, NO HOW accommodate
the sheer number of users that now have cell phones. So, your continual argument
that the advent of digital was driven by some conspiracy of greed, is total and complete
BS. Digital is and was the ONLY way to accommodate today's number of users. AMPS
is an old antiquated and OBSOLETE technology, it couldn't handle the increased traffic.

Also, the market demanded portability. It wasn't forced on the public like you infer.
The FCC mandated .6w. This was by regulation, not by some plot cooked up by
cell phone companies to cram more users onto the systems. More total BS....

Power control is integral to how CDMA operates and was part of the standard
from the very beginning. BTW, you do know that AMPS has/had power control, right?

I don't have time to counter your errors point by point. Nat and other newbies, please
be wise and take this type of 'expert' advice with a VERY large grain of salt. It ain't
anywhere near correct.
Post by Larry W4CSC
Post by Nat
After reading the well informed people who hang out here, it occurs to me
you're a lot better informed than I. I've been a Verizon customer for,
I guess, about 10 years or so? Anyway, I've never really done the
math. Is it really better to do the 2-yr deal and lock yourself in or
face a $175 hit? Or, is it better to pay more, get a 1-yr deal and
have the opportunity to stay current? I ask, because I have an old
LG510? phone and I understand the newer phones "get out" better in
poor/weak areas?? I know every situation is different, but do some of
you have some "general" thoughts about 1yr vs. 2yr? It seems that with
the rapid changes in phones, 2-yrs might be a long time to wait.
Thanks, Nathaniel
If you are happy with your current plan setup, Nat, I wouldn't sign
anything or take the carrot phone dangling from that stick. The reason the
company dangles the stick is so it can make changes to its system, usually
to boost profits, not improve customer service and give you something for
free. The newer the phone, two things have happened.....
We started out with phones transmitting 3 watts of RF power from
substantial antennas. These transmitters covered way too much area,
soaking up the channels across larger areas, which worked great but limited
the number of billable minutes per square mile per channel. The solution
was simple....put up more, smaller towers and reduce the range of the
phones from a 10 mile circle to a 3 mile circle. The AMPS flipphone was
the result. It's transmitter only put out 6/10th of a watt (600 mw) and
they reduced the substantial "rubber duck" 1/4 wave antenna with a real
elevated ground sleeve to a 1/4 wave stub right up next to the customer's
RF-absorbing head, which gave us the poor service on the AMPS system
designed for 3 watt phones with real antennas. The public was pissed.
Their service went from good to sucks, for the "convenience" of the pocket
phone.
About this time CDMA, TDMA, and a host of other INCOMPATIBLE digitizing
schemes came along that needed to be sold to the customers. Cellular took
this opportunity to increase their billable minutes per square mile per
channel to new heights by installing lots of little cells, and reducing
power even further to 2/10th of a watt (200 mw). Of course, logic would
tell you the range of the 200 mw phone was no where near the 600 mw phones.
Physics, no matter what the marketing department says, still controls radio
propagation. The modulation schemes allowed the companies to share the
channel amoungst many users. This number expanded as the modulation
schemes came out with new revisions and bug fixes...just like your
computer. One of the problems these modulation schemes encountered was
receiver recovery in the microseconds between the phone a block from the
tower to a phone out on the fringe screaming its head off at "full power",
200 mw. The strong station blocked the receiver's listening ability after
it went off the air after its packet, and the receiver missed a piece of
the data packet of the weak one. The solution to this problem was power
control. Your 200 mw phone in short range of the towers on a concentrated
system rarely runs 200 mw. When the CDMA system becomes confused with the
data, you hear the echo everyone has heard, or it sounds like your party is
underwater with missing data or the phone simply cuts off to prevent
pissing you off with lousier-than-normal sound. You frantically move
around looking for a "hot spot" where the data stream opens the phone,
again. (AMPS customers hunt easier to get the hissing of the FM receiver
to quiet.)
Cellular has no economic reason to make your NEW-every-two phone have more
power and range. No, it's to their advantage to REDUCE the power and range
of your phone even further, once again to increase the revenue they can
squeeze out of every square mile of urban area. Many new phones have "new
features", like 150 milliwatt transmitters and non-existant antennas built
into the case, which that pesky physics says will reduce the field strength
of the transmitters even further. None of it is about improving range you
have to the towers, especially out of town where there will NEVER be a
tower every 2 miles in all directions for the little toyphones to contact
because those towers would NEVER produce the kinds of revenue streams that
make them profitable.....
If you're not interested in buying a toy with video games on it that makes
toy sounds and has blinky lights....keep the old phone which IS a better
TELEPHONE. If you want a new game boy buy a GAMEBOY to go with your old
phone....(c;
Sorry you can't have a big, honkin', powerful old AMPS bagphone like mine
for that trip in the country......AMPS COUNTRY. The rest of it is just
bullshit.
Larry
Nat
2004-04-28 06:48:03 UTC
Permalink
Larry W4CSC wrote:
..snip...
Post by Larry W4CSC
If you are happy with your current plan setup, Nat, I wouldn't sign
anything or take the carrot phone dangling from that stick. The
..snip..
Post by Larry W4CSC
Sorry you can't have a big, honkin', powerful old AMPS bagphone like
mine for that trip in the country......AMPS COUNTRY. The rest of it
is just bullshit.
Larry
Larry, wow, what an informative post. Thanks!

Nat
plane
2004-04-28 02:29:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nat
After reading the well informed people who hang out here, it occurs to me
you're a lot better informed than I. I've been a Verizon customer for, I
guess, about 10 years or so? Anyway, I've never really done the math. Is it
really better to do the 2-yr deal and lock yourself in or face a $175 hit?
Or, is it better to pay more, get a 1-yr deal and have the opportunity to
stay current? I ask, because I have an old LG510? phone and I understand
the newer phones "get out" better in poor/weak areas?? I know every
situation is different, but do some of you have some "general" thoughts
about 1yr vs. 2yr? It seems that with the rapid changes in phones, 2-yrs
might be a long time to wait.
Thanks, Nathaniel
if not better informed, at least more opinionated:

but reading over these posts, and with my own recent less than happy
experiences with vzm c/s, I am very reluctant to sign another contract
with them--my experience, is that they were easier to deal with in the
past, but as someone mentioned , they offer free this and that, but
with a contract.A year or so ago, I could not imagine not using
verizon--but due to some recent c/s folks who must have worked for
either sprint or cingular--they may push me to another carrier--at
present, even with their sub standard c/s, vsw still has the best
network coverage, but they are become a bitch to deal with---to put in
prespective, it only costs $175 to cancel, and over a peroid of a few
months, the free extra will equal to this--so the old 6 of one and
half a dozen of the other. I can see a contract when you re given a
discount on a new phone, but this 1-2 year contract thing is a bit
much. In reality, it's really difficult to make a straight forward
deal--folks have to feel like they are getting a "deal", and for years
the work *free* always sets off alarms in my mind. Like that *free
sex* in marriage, the sex may be free, but its the regular maintance
and cancellation charge that really hurts. other analogy's can be
implied also.
Nat
2004-04-28 07:12:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by plane
Post by Nat
After reading the well informed people who hang out here, it occurs
to me you're a lot better informed than I. I've been a Verizon
customer for, I guess, about 10 years or so? Anyway, I've never
really done the math. Is it really better to do the 2-yr deal and
lock yourself in or face a $175 hit? Or, is it better to pay more,
get a 1-yr deal and have the opportunity to stay current? I ask,
because I have an old LG510? phone and I understand the newer
phones "get out" better in poor/weak areas?? I know every situation
is different, but do some of you have some "general" thoughts about
1yr vs. 2yr? It seems that with the rapid changes in phones, 2-yrs
might be a long time to wait.
Thanks, Nathaniel
but reading over these posts, and with my own recent less than happy
experiences with vzm c/s, I am very reluctant to sign another contract
with them--my experience, is that they were easier to deal with in the
past, but as someone mentioned , they offer free this and that, but
with a contract.A year or so ago, I could not imagine not using
verizon--but due to some recent c/s folks who must have worked for
either sprint or cingular--they may push me to another carrier--at
present, even with their sub standard c/s, vsw still has the best
network coverage, but they are become a bitch to deal with---to put in
prespective, it only costs $175 to cancel, and over a peroid of a few
months, the free extra will equal to this--so the old 6 of one and
half a dozen of the other. I can see a contract when you re given a
discount on a new phone, but this 1-2 year contract thing is a bit
much. In reality, it's really difficult to make a straight forward
deal--folks have to feel like they are getting a "deal", and for years
the work *free* always sets off alarms in my mind. Like that *free
sex* in marriage, the sex may be free, but its the regular maintance
and cancellation charge that really hurts. other analogy's can be
implied also.
Plane, thanks for the help and opinion. The more I think about it and the
more I read opinions, the more I think I'll probably keep the phone I have
and keep my options open. I agree that Verizon's c/s doesn't seem to be that
"fresh, new" kind of service when they first started out. I don't recall
exactly when I first started with Verizon, but it was at least 10+ years ago
and I think they only offered about 3 different phones or so. Back them
their headquarters for this area was in the Irvine area and they shipped
right from there. You actually felt like you were dealing direct with
someone on a personal basis. I recall the sales rep sending me her card and
a note saying something like, "Call if you have any questions or concerns."
Now, other than some retail locations, you may well be directed to some
third party group in Bangor Maine or India or Ireland or the moon for all I
know. But most importantly, they just don't seem to care like they used to.
I remember calling, leaving a question, someone saying they would get back
to me and never hearing anything. Or, leaving a message via their website
for the president and hearing nothing.

Oh, well, didn't mean to vent, but I agree with the service issue. Maybe it
will just be worth it to keep my old phone, with the batterey that still
hasn't given up its capacity to recharge... and to feel I can drop the like
a hot potato whenever I wish to.

Thanks, Nat
Larry W4CSC
2004-04-28 12:42:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by plane
the work *free* always sets off alarms in my mind. Like that *free
sex* in marriage, the sex may be free, but its the regular maintance
and cancellation charge that really hurts. other analogy's can be
implied also.
Hmm...interesting analogy. I always viewed marriage as prepaid
prostitution, which like any prepaid service once they got your money they
lost interest in delivering the product...(c;

One food is devastating to a woman's sexual libido.....wedding cake.

Larry W4CSC
17 years in the "Three Times A Year Club", single again since 1992 and back
on the market...(c;
Raymond Castro
2004-04-28 18:09:30 UTC
Permalink
I've been a Verizon customer for 3 years, and I started with the LG
TM510 phone. I chose the 2-year deal because I learned Verizon had
(and still has) the best cell phone coverage in my area. I was so
happy with my phone at the end of the two year deal that I would have
replaced the worn down battery and continued to use it. However, I
didn't want the $100 discount at the end of the program to go to
waste, so I went for the latest and greatest LG VX6000 with the camera
and other fancy stuff. With the discount, additional rebates, sale
prices at the time, and another 2-yr contract it only cost $50 for the
new phone. It was a great phone too and I had no inconveniences with
coverage just like with my trusty old LG TM510. The only problem I had
was that my workplace restricted camera phones, so just the other day
I switched to a Motorola v60s to avoid the hassle. It reminds me of my
TM510, but a bit longer with a speakerphone. I aquired the LG VX6000
nine months ago as part of the New-Every-Two program, but online I was
able to "upgrade" to the Motorola v60s at the regional $29 sale price.
I was only given a partial selection of phones for an upgrade, and
there was no $100 discount, but I think it shows that although you are
"locked in" with a $175 termination fee on the subscription, you're
not locked in to your current phone on a 2-yr plan if you desire an
update.

If you're happy with Verizon's service coverage, I would go ahead and
do a 2-year renewal if it results in any savings/discounts. If you're
happy with your LG TM510, I would update the battery if necessary
continue to use it because none of the newer phones are as small. To
not let the $100 discount at the end of two years go to waste, you
could upgrade anyway to add/update a family member's phone (My VX6000
will replace my wife's Kyocera 2135). Or, I would recommend the
Motorola v60s if you don't mind if the phone is a little bigger.
Depending on where you live, it might not cost you anything more aside
from sales tax and additional accesories like a car charger.

Hope this helps!
Ray
Post by Nat
Is it
really better to do the 2-yr deal and lock yourself in or face a $175 hit?
Or, is it better to pay more, get a 1-yr deal and have the opportunity to
stay current? I ask, because I have an old LG510? phone and I understand
the newer phones "get out" better in poor/weak areas?? I know every
situation is different, but do some of you have some "general" thoughts
about 1yr vs. 2yr? It seems that with the rapid changes in phones, 2-yrs
might be a long time to wait.
Me
2004-04-28 21:19:41 UTC
Permalink
I just went through this- same situation, with 2 lg-510's, two year
contract ending. I left the money on the table...I don't want to get
stuck for another two years with any phone. It just depends on how
you value having a new phone vs the $100...
Quick
2004-04-28 21:27:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Me
I just went through this- same situation, with 2 lg-510's, two year
contract ending. I left the money on the table...I don't want to get
stuck for another two years with any phone. It just depends on how
you value having a new phone vs the $100...
Agreed (and IMHO the 510 is a solid phone).

I don't think you *left* the money on the table though. I believe
it's still there and will remain there until (if) you decide to upgrade
your equipment at some time (and want to commit to another
2 yr. contract).

-Quick
Peter Pan
2004-04-28 21:58:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quick
Post by Me
I just went through this- same situation, with 2 lg-510's, two year
contract ending. I left the money on the table...I don't want to get
stuck for another two years with any phone. It just depends on how
you value having a new phone vs the $100...
Agreed (and IMHO the 510 is a solid phone).
I don't think you *left* the money on the table though. I believe
it's still there and will remain there until (if) you decide to
upgrade your equipment at some time (and want to commit to another
2 yr. contract).
-Quick
I wish that was true in mine and a friends case (and several thousand
others). Some sleazeball went thru the accounts, found who was eligible for
new phones, got them himself and sold em. Our records show a phone upgrade
occurred, even though it never happened for us. Verizon claims they will fix
it, but to date (almost a year later), they have done absolutely NOTHING. As
a matter of fact, our accounts all show our new every two (that should have
been up last year), is now June/July of 2005!
If I had it to do over again, I'd take a new phone, put it in a drawer as a
backup, and keep the old one!
Be careful about leaving your money on the table, one of the minimum wage
people at a store may steal it!
Roger Binns
2004-04-28 21:13:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond Castro
However, I
didn't want the $100 discount at the end of the program to go to
waste, so I went for the latest and greatest LG VX6000 with the camera
and other fancy stuff. With the discount, additional rebates, sale
prices at the time, and another 2-yr contract it only cost $50 for the
new phone.
Don't forget you can do an ESN swap back to your old phone and put
the new one on eBay. It is kind of free money if you were going to
be on Verizon for the next two years anyway. (New VX6000's go for
$250-300 on eBay. That covers the ETF and your $50 cost should you
later change your mind).

Roger
N***@northnet.org
2004-04-29 11:31:37 UTC
Permalink
I recently got a LG VX4400B on a Every 2. It didn't cost me anytihing and
my TM510 cables still worked. I did buy a new USB cable. I got the 4400
because it's tri-mode and I wanted the 1x for internet when I'm traveling.
I'll use the 4400 about 4 weeks a year, otherwise I'm still using the
510. If the 510 breaks, I have a ready spare.

Pat
Post by Raymond Castro
However, I
didn't want the $100 discount at the end of the program to go to
waste, so I went for the latest and greatest LG VX6000 with the camera
and other fancy stuff. With the discount, additional rebates, sale
prices at the time, and another 2-yr contract it only cost $50 for the
new phone.
Don't forget you can do an ESN swap back to your old phone and put the
new one on eBay. It is kind of free money if you were going to be on
Verizon for the next two years anyway. (New VX6000's go for $250-300 on
eBay. That covers the ETF and your $50 cost should you later change your
mind).
Roger
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